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Reynaldo Mariqueo and Jean Michel Parasiliti di Para

The history of the Kingdom of Araucania and Patagonia is immensely fascinating.  People from around the globe, people with widely varying interests, long have been attracted to this story, curious to learn more.  The fact that you are reading this page is a sign that you are one of those inquisitive people.


Founded in 1995, the North American Araucanian Royalist Society (NAARS) is the world's leading source of reliable, objective, English-language information about the history of the Kingdom of Araucania and Patagonia and the current operations of the Royal House of Araucania and Patagonia.  While there are other groups interested in the kingdom, some groups have an ideological ax to grind and others have old scores to settle.


In contrast, the NAARS prides itself on being independent and nonpartisan.  We gather all manner of information about the Kingdom of Araucania and Patagonia and the Royal House of Araucania and Patagonia. Much of this information comes from difficult-to-locate historical resources in a variety of languages.  Other information comes from regular contact with key members of the Royal House of Araucania and Patagonia. And some information even comes from sworn enemies of the Kingdom and the Royal House. 

Prince Philippe I

Having gathered this wide range of information, the NAARS then translates documents into English and makes them available through its 1) archive, 2) website, and 3) journal.  Regarding matters which are controversial or contested, we simple publish the best information we have and allow our discerning readers to draw their own conclusions.


The entire content of this site – all text and all photographs – are under copyright and may not be reproduced without written permission.



Top photo: Reynaldo Mariqueo, Count of Lul-lul Mawidha (left) with Jean-Michel Parasiliti di Para, Prince Antoine IV of Araucania in front of the chapel at La Cheze.  Photo taken in 2008 by Viscount Franz de Malimensu.

Bottom photo: Prince Philippe I next to a bust of King Orelie-Antoine, at the Museum of Art and Archeology of Perigord in Perigueux, France.  Photo taken 1996 by Daniel Paul Morrison.